Paramedic reveals the most shocking moment of his career to date 





‘It was incredibly confronting’: Paramedic, 28, reveals the worst moment of his career – watching a girl the same age as his daughter die in front of him as he desperately tried to save her life

  • Paramedic Josh Payne has revealed the moment that shocked him the most
  • The star of TV show Ambulance Australia recalled having to watch a child die  
  • Josh, 28, said he will often debrief with friends after similar incidents 
  • He has learned to leave the job at work with him when he goes home at night 

Kristy Johnson For Daily Mail Australia

An Australian paramedic has revealed the most shocking moment of his career to date.

Josh Payne, who has been a paramedic for seven years, told Ten Daily on Tuesday that he once saw a four-year-old girl die in front of him. 

The death hit the 28-year-old particularly hard, as he has a daughter who was the same age at the time.   

Josh, who stars on Ten’s Ambulance Australia program, said he will often debrief with friends after similar incidents, and tries to leave the job at work when he goes home.

'I watched a four-year-old girl die in front of me': Paramedic Josh Payne [pictured with a colleague] revealed the most shocking moment of his career

'I watched a four-year-old girl die in front of me': Paramedic Josh Payne [pictured with a colleague] revealed the most shocking moment of his career

‘I watched a four-year-old girl die in front of me’: Paramedic Josh Payne [pictured with a colleague] revealed the most shocking moment of his career

Speaking about the time he and his fellow paramedics were unable to revive a four-year-old girl, Josh said: ‘I’ll never forget the time we were called out to a job where a four-year-old girl suffered a cardiac arrest from a medical episode.’

‘When we got there we tried to revive her… we did everything… but she ended up passing away.’

Tragic: Josh recalled seeing a four-year-old girl [not pictured] die after she was unable to be revived 

Tragic: Josh recalled seeing a four-year-old girl [not pictured] die after she was unable to be revived 

Tragic: Josh recalled seeing a four-year-old girl [not pictured] die after she was unable to be revived 

Loss: 'When we got there we tried to revive her... we did everything... but she ended up passing away,' the 28-year-old said 

Loss: 'When we got there we tried to revive her... we did everything... but she ended up passing away,' the 28-year-old said 

Loss: ‘When we got there we tried to revive her… we did everything… but she ended up passing away,’ the 28-year-old said 

Josh said that out of all the paramedics, it hit him particularly hard, as he has a daughter, who was the same age as the girl at the time.

‘Seeing her family so hurt and seeing her father trying to give her CPR was incredibly confronting,’ he revealed.

Josh added that he will debrief with friends after similar incidents, and try to leave the job at work when he goes home. 

Veteran: The role of a paramedic can play a toll, and that's exactly the case for Sandy Macken [pictured], who has worked for 20 years in the profession 

Veteran: The role of a paramedic can play a toll, and that's exactly the case for Sandy Macken [pictured], who has worked for 20 years in the profession 

Veteran: The role of a paramedic can play a toll, and that’s exactly the case for Sandy Macken [pictured], who has worked for 20 years in the profession 

The role of a paramedic can play a toll, and that’s exactly the case for Sandy Macken, who has worked in the profession for 20 years.  

The Sydney paramedic, who has carried the burden of many of her patients and often forgot to look after herself, endured years struggling to keep her head above water.   

‘At my very peak, my lowest point I woke up one morning and I thought, ‘I can’t face another day’,’ she told 9news.com.au in October.

‘I felt very burnt out, very burdened. I wasn’t looking after myself. I didn’t have the skills or the tools that were necessary for me personally to cope.’   

Challenges: 'At my very peak, my lowest point I woke up one morning and I thought, 'I can't face another day',' she candidly told 9news.com.au in October 

Challenges: 'At my very peak, my lowest point I woke up one morning and I thought, 'I can't face another day',' she candidly told 9news.com.au in October 

Challenges: ‘At my very peak, my lowest point I woke up one morning and I thought, ‘I can’t face another day’,’ she candidly told 9news.com.au in October 

Sandy added: 'I felt very burnt out, very burdened. I wasn't looking after myself. I didn't have the skills or the tools that were necessary for me personally to cope' 

Sandy added: 'I felt very burnt out, very burdened. I wasn't looking after myself. I didn't have the skills or the tools that were necessary for me personally to cope' 

Sandy added: ‘I felt very burnt out, very burdened. I wasn’t looking after myself. I didn’t have the skills or the tools that were necessary for me personally to cope’ 

In her book, Paramedic: One Woman’s 20 Years on the Frontline, Sandy details the incredible experiences she’s had working as a first responder in Sydney, including one man who had his limbs severed by a train.

‘[The trauma] is difficult at the time but there’s something that happens in difficult circumstances where the human spirit really has an opportunity to shine forth and shine bright.

‘I would consider myself a better person for the trauma that I’ve had to deal with and that I’ve had to help other people deal with.’

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